Pixar Animation Studios reviews: Up

Pixar Studios 10th film.
Pixar Studios 10th film.

http://putlocker.ac/watch-up-online-free-putlocker-2009.html

My opinion right after watching film

My opinion right after watching the film is that it is very good. I have only watched this film once before, and I was astounded by it, but rewatching, I did not feel the same magic. I like a lot of aspects about the movie, and I feel like the characters were strong, but there were some stuff that were a bit too loopy and unexplained for my liking. No tone of my favourite Pixar films.

Production

Development of the film started in 2004, when Pete Docter wrote the concept, which was based on escaping life’s problems by flying away with balloons. An old man was decided to be the protagonist because they writers felt like it would result in a lot of humor, not worrying about children not being able to identify because they would see Carl as their grandparent. An initial concept involved two brothers fighting over a throne, and when the ballooned castle fell on Earth, they met a bird who helped them understand one another.

Docter decided to use this film to dedicate his friendships with the deceased Disney veterans Frank Thomas and Ollie Johnston, while also dedicating it to Joe Granft, who told him to set an emotional bedrock (the first few minutes) because of the wild adventure was to come. In a way, this film was seen as a way for Pixar to handle their grievances for the loss that Disney and their own studio has suffered over the past few years, since one of the main plot points of the film involve grief.

After receiving a video of the Tepui mountains, the main setting was officially to take place in Venezuela. The crew spent three days in various mountains in 2004, drawing various images of the tepui mountains, which was out of their world. They also visited Sacramento zoo. Character designs for Carl and Russell were going to be overtly characterized, though they wanted it to seem somewhat realistic, so they would not look like the humans in the Toy Story franchise.

Story 

The film starts in 1940, where a 9 years old Carl Fredricksen (Jeremy Leart and Ed Asner) is in the movie theaters, watching a documentary of some sorts about the explorer named Charles Mintz (Christopher Plummer). Everyone doubts the explorer about fabricating about a bird he found in Paradise Falls, and he promises to come back with the bird. Carl leaves the movie theaters, and meets a little girl named Ellie (Elizabeth Docter), as they bond abut exploring, an Charles Mintz. We get a montage about their friendship soon blossoming to a marriage, and ho they saved up to go to Paradise Falls, but life gets in the way. They focus on the dream to visit Paradise Falls after she suffers a miscarriage, and is told that she cannot have children. As they become older, they have to slow down, but right as they are about to go on the trip, Ellie gets sick, and dies. We all know it is sad, and I did almost cry when I saw it. Nothing more to say, and I like how it captures the essence of present life, and the trials of a marriage and aging.

It is clear that some years have passed, and he is more miserable than ever, because the government is building a nice condo complex right by where his house is, and they want him to move to a retirement house, so they can blow the house down. Of course, he does not want to go into a retirement home, or leave his house. A construction worker ends up breaking his mailbox, which causes him to swing his cane at the worker’s head, giving him an injury. This is taken to court, where he loses and is told that it is a court order for him to move into the retirement home. A little kid named Russell (Jordan Nagai) rings the doorbell to get his last boy’s scout bade, which is to help out and assist the elderly. Carl sends him off, but he ends up being stuck with him.

The workers of the retirement home shows up at his house to pick him up, but he releases a bunch of helium balloons, so his house could take off. Wait, so he did ALL OF THIS within the timespan of an evening? Or was he working on this for months? How would he be able to compress all of the helium balloons before it was necessary to take off? I am trying not to be nit-picky, but a lot of this is too wacky for me to understand. And how did Russell get stuck at his house? Was he there the entire time, and just did not ring the doorbell? You know what? I am tripping myself out, since the more I think, the more confused I get.
The workers of the retirement home shows up at his house to pick him up, but he releases a bunch of helium balloons, so his house could take off. Wait, so he did ALL OF THIS within the timespan of an evening? Or was he working on this for months? How would he be able to compress all of the helium balloons before it was necessary to take off? I am trying not to be nit-picky, but a lot of this is too wacky for me to understand. And how did Russell get stuck at his house? Was he there the entire time, and just did not ring the doorbell? You know what? I am tripping myself out, since the more I think, the more confused I get.

It was Ellie’s dream to take the house to Paradise Falls, so he took the opportunity to finally make their dream come true, but is angered when he is stuck with Russell. The balloons are used as a way to navigate through the wind circuitry, as he cuts some of them to steer it in a certain direction. How the HELL is Russell able to breathe if they are in the sky? This does not make any sense. They are about to enter a thunderstorm, but he does not hear it since Carl turned off his hearing aid after listening to Russell blab. Of course they end up escaping it, but it forces them to land in a more than abrupt manner.

The two decide to walk the house to the other side of Paradise Falls, since they landed on the wrong side. A bird ends up running and dodging the countless traps meant to capture him, and the dogs that are chasing him down. While Russell goes to the washroom, he sees the footprints, and decides to follow it. The bird is attracted to the chocolate in his hand, so Russell uses it to get the bird to follow him to Carl, so is less than thrilled, and wants the bird gone. They meet a dog named Dug (Bob Peterson), who is looking for a bird for his master, and Carl wants the both of them to leave. We learn that the dogs speaks through a collar, that allows them to speak English, making it easy for the master to understand them. We learn that Russell’s father is extremely annoyed with him, and is always out at work, while Russell calls his mother Phyllis because it is his stepmother instead. It is a nice moment between the two of them, and why Russell is so clingy to Carl.

It turns out that Charles Muntz is the master of the dogs, who is still after the bird. WAIT, HOLD ON, HOLD ON, HOLD ON. If Carl was born in the early 1930s (meaning he is hitting 80 during the present day of the film), and Charles was in his 20s or 30s in the 1930s, this means that.......... Charles is either in his 90s or 100s. It is possible (though rare) for people to live that long, and it is even rarer for someone living in isolation and is an adventurer to live that long. It just seems very convenient to me. Charles invites them to eat with him, and he goes on and on about his obsession with the bird, and we see that he clearly went into madness over the years. He goes on about how everyone called him a fraud, and it caused him to be bitter. When Russell mentions that they saw the bird (which he deems as Kevin), Charles turns on them, and decides to threaten and go after them.
It turns out that Charles Muntz is the master of the dogs, who is still after the bird. WAIT, HOLD ON, HOLD ON, HOLD ON. If Carl was born in the early 1930s (meaning he is hitting 80 during the present day of the film), and Charles was in his 20s or 30s in the 1930s, this means that………. Charles is either in his 90s or 100s. It is possible (though rare) for people to live that long, and it is even rarer for someone living in isolation and is an adventurer to live that long. It just seems very convenient to me.
Charles invites them to eat with him, and he goes on and on about his obsession with the bird, and we see that he clearly went into madness over the years. He goes on about how everyone called him a fraud, and it caused him to be bitter. When Russell mentions that they saw the bird (which he deems as Kevin), Charles turns on them, and decides to threaten and go after them.

They run for their lives, and Dug joins them, since the other dogs see him as a traitor. When they manage to get the bird, Charles lights the house, and Carl goes to dim out the fire, letting the bird get trapped. Of course this causes tension between Carl and Russell, since the child is mad that he broke his promise (though he made it clear that he never wanted Kevin anyways). Russell decides to be a dumbass, and get the bird back himself, while Carl finally is able to look at the adventure book, which Ellie put pictures of their marriage as her adventure, and telling him to find a new one. We get to the climax, and it’s fun to see the old men struggle as they go through the old man pains while they fight with one another. Long story short, the house and Charles end up falling to their deaths.

Once they make it to the floor, Kevin the bird reunites with her children as they say their goodbyes. Dug joins Carl and Russell to America (as well as most of the other dogs), and we meet Russell’s stepmother when he is promoted to a Senior Wilderness Expert. His father is still not there, and we learn that his father is not crap, which is honestly very saddening. The film ends with the three of them eating at the ice cream shop (which is where the house was), and the house ended up landing at the other side of Paradise Falls, which is what he wanted.

I like this film, but not as much as the other films, and not as much as I did the last time I watched it. The leaps out of logic bothered me more than I wanted it to, and I just could not ignore it. I like the dynamic of an older figure and a younger figure bonding that has nothing to do with family, and I like the message of finding a new adventure when the old ones end. The emotion in this film is very strong, and I am assuming that is the most important part. Not one of the best in my eyes, but it is still pretty good and enjoyable.
I like this film, but not as much as the other films, and not as much as I did the last time I watched it. The leaps out of logic bothered me more than I wanted it to, and I just could not ignore it. I like the dynamic of an older figure and a younger figure bonding that has nothing to do with family, and I like the message of finding a new adventure when the old ones end. The emotion in this film is very strong, and I am assuming that is the most important part. Not one of the best in my eyes, but it is still pretty good and enjoyable.

Characters

I actually quite like the characters, and it is refreshing that there is not too many. Pixar suffers at times for introducing way too many characters in their films, so it was nice to see this smaller cast, making it easier to focus.

He is proof that elders can be strong main characters in film, and while still very flawed, there is a softer side to him. Seeing him mourn, and then get to become somewhat of a father with his relationship with Russell. Very neat.
He is proof that elders can be strong main characters in film, and while still very flawed, there is a softer side to him. Seeing him mourn, and then get to become somewhat of a father with his relationship with Russell. Very neat.
He is an adventurer who spent his entire lifestyle obsessing over capturing a creature to regain his reputation (even after no one knows who he is anymore). He is an alright antagonist and villain. Not the most memorable overall. Eh.
He is an adventurer who spent his entire lifestyle obsessing over capturing a creature to regain his reputation (even after no one knows who he is anymore). He is an alright antagonist and villain. Not the most memorable overall. Eh.
He could be borderline annoying, and follow the typical trend of children in animation; either very irritating to very cute. When you think about it, he is a really sad character, with the lack of a father, and no one really wanting to spend time with him.
He could be borderline annoying, and follow the typical trend of children in animation; either very irritating to very cute. When you think about it, he is a really sad character, with the lack of a father, and no one really wanting to spend time with him.
Dug was a dog that belonged to Charles, but I guess he was more happy-go-lucky than the others, and was seen as a joke. He is very funny, and I enjoyed him well enough.
Dug was a dog that belonged to Charles, but I guess he was more happy-go-lucky than the others, and was seen as a joke. He is very funny, and I enjoyed him well enough.

Animation

The humans were a lot more cartoony than they were in The Incredibles even, and while I do not like the overly cartoony styles for humans, it seems to have worked for the film. I was more impressed with the background designs, and the textures of the animal characters. Color was very prominent in the film, since there were a lot of varied settings, and more color would appear when there was an optimistic opportunity arising, which I found very neat.

Music

The music was composed by Michael Giacchino, and he was told to put a lot of emphasis in the emotion of the music, which works out really well. A lot of the characters have their own theme music, which is slowly altered as the film goes on. It is a very neat twist, and while I could not name a specific theme of the score, the music was still very strong. Apparently this is the first score to ever win an award by the Oscars.

Reception at Release

When the film was released on May 29th, 2009, it made $293,004,164 domestically, and $442,094,918 in other territories, with a worldwide total of $735,099,082. It is the 18th highest-grossing animated film, 6th highest-grossing Pixar film, and the 6th highest-grossing film of 2009.

It was yet again another Pixar film that was critically acclaimed, with people liking the wit and depth in the film, ranging from a variety of tones that were in the film. Most people talked about the first 10 minutes of course, and many found it to be the funniest Pixar film. A lot of Asian-American networks praised the portrayal of Russell, and many people liked the choice to make an elder the main protagonist.

Pixar had another good year in the accolades, with Up pretty much stealing all of the awards, yet again. The film received such critical praise that it was the second film to be nominated for Best Picture after almost two decades (the first being Beauty and the Beast), though some believe that it was included because the nominee slot was increased from that year onwards. I believe it won all the Best Animated Film awards through the season as well.

Reception Today

It’s reception today has not really changed. I believe there is still a strong enough presence in the  theme parks, though it is one of the films that will most likely not get a sequel, so its reputation might suffer a bit just for not being one of the films to have a franchise. It is held in very high regards today, and is debatably seen as the best Pixar film.

Final Score

Story: 7/10

Characters: 8/10

Animation: 8.5/10

Music: 8/10

= 31.5/40 = 79%

Next time…

Review: November 20th, 2016
Review: November 20th, 2016
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19 thoughts on “Pixar Animation Studios reviews: Up

  1. My favorite movie. It’s about forgiveness and regret and grief. I love the ending when Carl see’s the message from Ellie and he knows she really did love him. I’m willing to forgive the age problem. But other than that I think it is just about perfect. Makes me cry and think of my grandpa whenever I watch it.

    1. It does connect me to my deceased grandparents as well. I like the message of starting another adventure once one ends… And I realized both reviews were about that. Certain holes were just a bit too wacky for me.

    1. Hello jacob.

      I had a feeling this review would be a bit controversial, since many see this as the best film. A lot of the wackiness was just a bit too much for me to believe, and it suffered in my eyes.

  2. I have become a little bit more critical towards the movie with the years, but I still think that the beginning is the best animated montage ever done. It is such a gut punch.

    1. The beginning did touch me, and brought back some memories with people I knew. I think the reason why I am not so emotionally touched with the film compared to most people who watched it when it was released

  3. I do agree with you on this one. I initially didn’t care too much for this film, but I have softened on it since then. While I don’t dislike it as much as I did before, it, like the rest of the Pixar movies that follow, just isn’t a movie I’d go back and watch over and over. The Pixar films from Wall-E through present day, thus far, have been like that for me. There’s just SOMETHING about them (I can’t exactly pinpoint it, though) that makes me feel that way. But more on those movies as we go along.

    I do agree with the consensus on the first 10-15 minutes of the movie. Easily the best part and I think you could’ve put “The End” at the end and people would’ve been satisfied. I know I would have.

    Keep up the great work and see you next time!

    1. Over the years, I have always thought that the first six Pixar films (up to The Incredibles) have a certain charm and rewatchability that the others do not really have. I have wavered a bit on that thought, but it is somewhat still there. I think it was because around Cars/Ratatouille/WALL-E, Pixar became “corporate” and they felt the need to one-up their last films, while with their earlier projects, most of it was conceptualized at a lunch.

  4. The first 10 minutes of this film are fantastic. The way it tells a story of two kids who fall in love and grow old together and the way it shows the ups and downs of their relationship like how they find out they can’t have kids and the way it’s shown through visuals and music and with no dialogue is absolutely brilliant.

    But then when Ellie dies, I think the film slowly starts to dip in quality. I find this film to be very similar to WALL-E. Both of these films start out very strongly, but then they get gradually worse as they continue. I feel both of these films are overrated because everyone claims that they’re consistently great films from beginning to end, when in my opinion they’re only great films at certain parts. A film needs to be consistent to be great and I feel both of these films are not consistent. I like both of these films, but I don’t think either of them are one of Pixar’s Top 5 best films. I feel both of them are in the middle of Pixar’s work.

    1. I think what bothers me about Up more so than WALL-E is that there is a lot less logic and a lot more goofiness. It was obvious what they would do with WALL-E, but I was not expecting flying houses and talking dogs flying around when watching the movie. Up is for sure not one of my favourites.

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