Pixar Animation Studios review: Brave

220px-brave_poster
Pixar’s 13th film.

http://putlocker.ac/watch-brave-online-free-2012-putlocker-v3.html

My opinion right after watching film

My opinion right after watching the film is that it is decent enough. I do have some issues with some of the pseudo-feminism in this film, and I wish that the execution was smoother. Most of the characters are fine enough, and the film was a bit more predictable than I was expecting. Not bad, but not great either, which the troubled production was enough information to predict this.

Production

The film was announced to the public in 2008, so the film probably started production in late 2007. Brenda Chapman conceptualized the project, claiming that it is a fairytale like the Hans Christian stories, and based the film from the relationship of her daughter. Many people were thrilled that this would be the first Pixar film to be directed by a female, but in October 2010, she was removed from the project, and replaced by Mark Andrews, due to creative differences. She claimed the news was devastating, though was proud of the film when it premiered.

Reese Witherspoon was initially cast to be Merida, but she declined after scheduling conflicts, causing her to be replaced by Kelly Macdonald. CEO and Pixar co-founder Steve Jobs passed away in late 2011, a few months before the film was released.

Pixar went out of their way to create a tartan to represent three of the four clans; DunBroch, Dingwall, and MacGuffin. It was registered by the Scottish Register of Tatrans upon the film’s release, and it represents the Scottish Highlands (green), the North Sea (blue), unity of the clans (navy blue), bloodshed due to war (red), and Scottish people overall (grey).

Story 

The film starts with King Fergus (Billy Connolly) and Queen Elinor (Emma Thompson) hanging out in the middle of the forest in medieval Scotland with their little girl named Merida (Peigi Barker and Kelly Macdonald), as they all seem to enjoy one another’s company, and are playful with one another. King Fergus gives Merida a bow and arrow, and Elinor is not thrilled in the slightest. She waits until Merida wanders off to lecture him about their daughter being a lady, and that she should not be partaking in that. Merida ends up seeing a wisp (which leads people to their fate, according to legend), while she fetches for the arrow, and the day takes a turn for the worse when a bear named Mor’du. The bear attacks the family, and the ladies are told to go, while Fergus tries to fight it off, but finds himself losing his left leg to the bear.

Years pass, and the royal couple has since given birth to triplet boys, while Elinor and Merida’s relationship takes a turn for the worse. Merida is tired of being told what to do, while Elinor is not thrilled that Merida does not take her education and tradition seriously. I give the film props for showing a princess taking part in education, and the politics of their kingdom, as well as the history. I do not recall any of the Disney Princesses learning about their kingdom’s history, and being taught anything regarding the royal life.

After having a day off to be free and to roman around, Elinor gets the news that all three of their rival kingdoms (and allies) have accepted the request to have the chance to marry Merida. Merida loses her mind, and............. I am getting Jasmine and Pocahontas flashbacks. We see Elinor teach her daughter everything, so this is something Merida should have realized earlier. Elinor goes to her daughter's room to tell her that marriage is not the end of the world. We see a segment involving Elinor pretending that her husband is Merida, and Merida is pretending that her horse is her mother. What we get from this is that they both want the other to understand one another, and want to be able to communicate this to the other. This is done a lot better than The Little Mermaid. The whole point of this is "whether you are willing to pay the price that freedom will cost!" It is clear that neither of them want to hurt one another. You see, it humanizes the both of them, with the scales being a lot larger.
After having a day off to be free and to roam around, Elinor gets the news that all three of their rival kingdoms (and allies) have accepted the request to have the chance to marry Merida. Merida loses her mind, and…………. I am getting Jasmine and Pocahontas flashbacks. We see Elinor teach her daughter everything, so this is something Merida should have realized earlier.
Elinor goes to her daughter’s room to tell her that marriage is not the end of the world. We see a segment involving Elinor pretending that her husband is Merida, and Merida is pretending that her horse is her mother. What we get from this is that they both want the other to understand one another, and want to be able to communicate this to the other. This is done a lot better than The Little Mermaid. The whole point of this is “whether you are willing to pay the price that freedom will cost!” It is clear that neither of them want to hurt one another. You see, it humanizes the both of them, with the scales being a lot larger.

The other three kingdoms Dingwall, MacIntosh, and MacGuffin arrive to DunBroch, and Elinor tries to give Merida advice, though struggles with how to speak to her. We see the men speak to one another, and announce their sons, but it is here where I start to have a problem with the film. It is clear that this film is carrying a feminist message, and I like that, but the point of feminism is to be equal to males, and just as capable. All of the men are portrayed as incompetent, ignorant buffoons, so the message gets simmered a bit.

After all of the men end up brawling (including Fergus), and Elinor handles them like a boss, she announces that Merida will choose the Highland games that will determine the which son will win over the betrothal. The teen finds a loophole to get out of this, and chooses archery (which we have shown her to excel at earlier in the film). Merida shocks everyone by entering herself to play for DunBroch, and of course shoots a perfect score. Elinor loses her mind, since this could easily mean that the other three clans declare war against DunBroch.

Okay, *inhales heavily* let me get my thoughts together, because you all KNOW I have a lot to say. The two go back and forth in her room, and Merida accuses her mother of NEVER being there for her, and calling her a beast. Elinor yells back that she is a princess, and has no idea what she has done to her kingdom. Merida whines like a brat, and YELL TO HER MOTHER that she would RATHER DIE than be like her, cutting the family tapestry in half. Elinor BEGS her to stop beforehand, and Merida has NO REMORSE after realizing what she did. Her mother removes the bow and arrow, and throws it in the fire. Merida runs out crying, and Elinor INSTANTLY regrets it. I get following your dreams and whatnot, but there is a WAY OF HANDLING IT. Saying you would rather "DIE" than be like your mother is a line that went WAY too far for me. People need to realize that when there is an action, there is a reaction and a consequence. I perfectly understand why many people hate Merida for this (though no one complains about Ariel), and this makes her very unlikable to me.
Okay, *inhales heavily* let me get my thoughts together, because you all KNOW I have a lot to say. The two go back and forth in her room, and Merida accuses her mother of NEVER being there for her, and calling her a beast. Elinor yells back that she is a princess, and has no idea what she has done to her kingdom. Merida whines like a brat, and YELL TO HER MOTHER that she would RATHER DIE than be like her, cutting the family tapestry in half. Elinor BEGS her to stop beforehand, and Merida has NO REMORSE after realizing what she did. Her mother removes the bow and arrow, and throws it in the fire in anger. Merida runs out crying, and Elinor INSTANTLY regrets it. I get following your dreams and whatnot, but there is a WAY OF HANDLING IT. Saying you would rather “DIE” than be like your mother is a line that went WAY too far for me. People need to realize that when there is an action, there is a reaction and a consequence. I perfectly understand why many people hate Merida for this (though no one complains about Ariel), and this makes her very unlikable to me.

Just when you think she cannot get any more horrible, Merida ends up at Boo a witch (Julie Walters)’s  cottage to CHANGE HER MOTHER. This not only crosses a line because altering someone’s mental and/or physical state WITHOUT their permission is borderline immoral, and she never even CONSIDERS the consequences for her actions. Merida takes a desert made from the witch, and as soon as she enters her house, her mother wants to clear the air about what happened earlier. Because Elinor stated that a decision still has to be made, Merida is all too thrilled to give her mother the pie. She does not react at all when her mother physically becomes ill (chanting that she hopes that her mind is changed up), and is shocked when she turns into Brother Bear. I am not thrilled with the twist, since I did not like that film in the first place, and we all know where things are going with this.

It takes a while for Elinor to realize that she is a bear, and is instantly pissed off with her daughter. The maid (Sally Kinghorn and Eilidh Fraser) sees the, and runs to tell Fergus, causing all of the men to chase after the bear (which they have soured on since the Mor’du event). She tells her brother the story of what happened, and they help the ladies sneak out. Merida chants over and over again that it is not her fault as a denial trick, and I only get more frustrated with her.

Merida and her mother end up at the witch's house, who has left a message for her. She says that she is gone until the spring, but that the spell will become permanent after the second sunrise, and the only way to reverse the spell is to "mend the bond that was torn by pride". Merida does not get it, and loses her mind over trying to understand the message, and only ruins the cottage. As the two fall asleep, Merida has a flashback of her mother singing the little girl to comfort after a thunderstorm scaring her. Elinor chanted that she will always be there for her daughter, so it is nice that she is starting to remember the better moments.
Merida and her mother end up at the witch’s house, who has left a message for her. She says that she is gone until the spring, but that the spell will become permanent after the second sunrise, and the only way to reverse the spell is to “mend the bond that was torn by pride”. Merida does not get it, and loses her mind over trying to understand the message, and only ruins the cottage. As the two fall asleep, Merida has a flashback of her mother singing the little girl to comfort after a thunderstorm scaring her. Elinor chanted that she will always be there for her daughter, so it is nice that she is starting to remember the better moments.

It is the next morning, and Elinor struggles to eat in the same fashion that she did as a human, as well as communicating with her daughter. Merida teaches her how to last in the wilderness, and the two start to bond again over fishing, while the song “Into the Open Air” plays. After this, Elinor starts to change into her bear instincts, which scared her daughter. She comes out of it, but a wisp shows up, which she desperately tries to grasp.

This somehow leads them to a castle in ruin, where Mor’Du resides. Merida soon realizes that Mor’Du was the prince in the story her mother was telling her about, and she realizes that the same thing happened to him. A fight scene erupts between the bear and the duo, but they escape, and manage to get back to the castle. All of the men are fighting because they are tired of the delaying news about which son won over Merida. She tries to speak to them using the story her mother taught her about the 4 kingdoms falling apart, which they dismiss as a myth. We learn that the kings of the 4 kingdoms are actually pretty good friends, and have done a lot for one another on a personal level, creating an alliance full of friendship and strength. It is nice to see her learn how to take more of a conservative and peaceful approach to the chaos.

All of the men see the bear, and as Merida tries to explain to her father what happened, he refuses to listen, since he is still butthurt about Mor’Du, and locks her in the room to prevent her from escaping, and to be safe. Her brothers need to help her out the door, and she sews back the tapestry, since it is symbolism to show the mended bond. She has to fight her father off to set Elinor free, and when he is convinced, Mor’Du shows up to fight her. Elinor has to be more aggressive, and gets the bear to fall under the fallen rock, and die. It is the second sunrise, and she falls. Merida puts the tapestry on her, and tells her mother how sorry she is, and takes responsibility for everything. You see……. a person with her story arc CAN develop, take responsibility, and try to fix everything. THIS is what caused the mother to become a human again. The kingdom’s alliance is stronger than ever, the marriage proposal is called off, and the mother and daughter bond is stronger than ever.

Honestly, I think this film has a really strong first half, and the second half kind of whittles. I like that they focuse on the mother and daughter relationship, and the conflict seems realistic. It was interesting to see the political aspects of royalty actually receive some focus, but Elinor turning into a bear was too far-fetched for me, and Merida is not...... very likable. Sure, she is better than Ariel, but that is not saying much at all. It is hard to make her redeemable. People were expecting this to be a lot more action-packed and more badass than it was, but there is a lot of predictability. The story could have been fleshed out a bit better, but I wish that the two bonded a bit more. The portrayal of the men was irritating in the film, and the humor was hit or miss. Definitely one of Pixar's weaker efforts, but I do think this film is pretty overhated, and it could have been worse.
Honestly, I think this film has a really strong first half, and the second half kind of whittles. I like that they focused on the mother and daughter relationship, and the conflict seems realistic. It was interesting to see the political aspects of royalty actually receive some focus, but Elinor turning into a bear was too far-fetched for me, and Merida is not…… very likable. Sure, she is better than Ariel, but that is not saying much at all. It is hard to make her redeemable. People were expecting this to be a lot more action-packed and more badass than it was, but there is a lot of predictability. The story could have been fleshed out a bit better, but I wish that the two bonded a bit more. The portrayal of the men was irritating in the film, and the humor was hit or miss. Definitely one of Pixar’s weaker efforts, but I do think this film is pretty overhated, and it could have been worse.

Characters

Honestly, I only like a few characters in the film, but I like that there is not a lot that we have to focus on.  A lot of them either are unmemorable jokes, or unlikable. There are only a few strong, likable characters in here.

merida
I do not see what makes her stand out compared to any other Disney Princess. She is whiny, ungrateful, unwilling to listen, refuses to take responsibility until there is absolutely no other option. She crosses a lot of the time, and it just made her unlikable in my eyes. I ended up rooting for Elinor in their arguments. This film wants to be seen as such a feminist movie, with the females to be seen as equal to the men, but A Bug’s Life did all of this, without needing to emphasize it and to bring down the men in the film. How the Disney Princess line portrays her irritates me.
queen-elinor
I like how she is a natural leader, and very a-type, though she is very humane as well. She understands the pressure of getting married, and the nervousness, but her delivery is off, which she has to learn how to deal with. Elinor is my favourite character in the film, because she holds more than her own, and is the most realistic character in the film. Seeing an active mother, and one who is struggling with maintaining her composure was very refreshing. I did notice how she was used to show that females were better than males, so don’t think I have not noticed it.
Fergus reminds me of the Sultan and Maurice in personality, but he is just larger. I liked how he interacted with his wife and children, though he often gets involved in the buffoonery with the other clans.
Fergus reminds me of the Sultan and Maurice in personality, but he is just larger. I liked how he interacted with his wife and children, though he often gets involved in the buffoonery with the other clans.
They are just silent trouble makers. That is it.
They are just silent trouble makers. That is it.
He ends up being the antagonist of the film, and I found it unnecessary. I get it that his story was used to compare to the fate Merida was facing, but to be the forced in villain only made me groan, since it kind of felt pointless. Very underwhelming, and barely a character to be honest.
He ends up being the antagonist of the film, and I found it unnecessary. I get it that his story was used to compare to the fate Merida was facing, but to be the forced in villain only made me groan, since it kind of felt pointless. Very underwhelming, and barely a character to be honest.

Animation

It is a Pixar film, so of course the animation would be great, despite some of the other aspects in the film not being so great. How they handled and animated hair showed great process, especially since they do not animate humans much in their canon. There is a lot more open landscapes, which gives us some great sets and lush atmospheres. I liked the human designs as well.

Music

There is a lot of Scottish elements in the soundtrack, which I am thrilled about. It gave us a lot of emotional and adventurous moments, which varied between scene and scene. The music is the first film in the canon to not be composed by Randy Newman, Thomas Newman, or Michael Giacchino (The Good Dinosaur being the other one), instead being composed by Patrick Doyle. The few songs that are in the film are nice to listen to, though they are not ones you will sing time and time again.  What you expect from the music in this film, you will pretty much get.

Reception at Release

When the film was released on June 22nd, 2012, it made $237,283,207 in North America, and $303,153,856, adding up for a worldwide total of $540,437,063, making it the 13th highest-grossing film of 2012. It was yet another successful Pixar film in the box office (no surprise), but it was not a groundbreaker box office wise.

Critically, it seemed like there was a lot of positive reception. Many people liked that for the first time in animation, the relationship between mother and daughter was the central focus of the film, since in most cases, the mothers are deceased, or the daughters relationship with their mother is never focused on. At the same time, a lot of people made passive aggressive comments about the film, claiming that it is more “Disney” instead of another groundbreaking Pixar film.

Nothing stopped the film from winning the Best Animated Feature award at the Oscars, which was very controversial at the time. Brave won a decent amount of awards, though it did lose to some of its contemporaries.

Reception Today

From what I have seen currently, the reception for this film has gotten even more mixed than the time of release. Either a lot of people forget about it completely, or claim that it is a predictable film that took shots at the formulas in Dinsey that they like so much. There are a decent amount of fans still, but a lot of people do not like that it is now considered a Disney Princess film (Merida is the 11th Disney Princess), and claim that this film only continued the slump that Pixar found itself in.

Final Score

Story: 6.5/10

Characters: 6.5/10

Animation: 8.5/10

Music: 8/10

= 29.5/40 = 74%

Next time…

Monsters University
Review: December 11th, 2016.
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10 thoughts on “Pixar Animation Studios review: Brave

  1. For me, this is the weakest Pixar film thus far. The reason? I was just so bored watching it. I may see it again to see if my opinion changes, but I don’t see it at this point. While Mor’Du does give me some flashbacks to the bear at the end of The Fox and the Hound (which is a good thing), it isn’t enough to rescue the movie.

    I think there’s a conversation to be had as to what kind of movie is the worst kind. The ones that make you evoke strong emotions (mostly anger) as to how horrible it is and the decisions the characters make and the direction it goes. Or the ones that make you feel nothing for them at all. They technically might not be as infuriating, but at the same time, their execution of the story and characters are done in a way that doesn’t get your attention or make you feel anything for the movie as a whole. In my opinion, I feel Brave is the latter. Nothing COMPLETELY wrong about it, but it failed to make me care about it because of its execution of the story and characters. On the other hand, I find a movie like Cars 2 to be the former. While it may technically be a worse movie than Brave, I’d say it makes one care enough about it with the issues it has to heavily criticize it, and therefore, would at least not be bored with it. And that is the reason why I would watch Cars 2 again before watching Brave. Also because i believe I have a bit of a high tolerance level.

    Keep up the great work and see you next time!

    1. I didn’t think much of Mor’Du, but after you mentioned it, he is a lot like the bear from The Fox and the Hound.

      Regarding what I think is worse, it depends. If something is complete trash, and I take offence to it, rather than a boring piece of trash, I guess it depends on what mood I am in at the time. It’s been a common theme in my blog for the past few years, so I understand your sentiment.

      Thank you.

  2. I think it is funny when you say nobody complains about Ariel. In my experince she is the most complained about princess (well there is generic complaints about the first 3, usually from those who do not like Disney films, but no detailed personality complaints really. I dislike that it seems like Merida and her mother had ruled and restrictions. The boys were not controlled at all and the options for Merida to marry would not fit the society’s standards either by real historical standards and people would not be that shocked that she was displeased even though she would still be expected what they were told. But that and the bear silliness just does not fit the more realistic athmospere they were going for with the resposiblities and compromise thing and the serious fantady athmospere. It was like there was two different films, neither of which that good.

    1. Maybe a decade ago people complained about Ariel, but I remember (within the last few years) that people complained about Merida being horrible, and excusing Ariel for almost doing the same thing.

      It was weird to see that the men had no rules or restrictions because they are expected to be incompetent buffoons.

      There is definitely a shift in the film, and is probably due to the production issues. It’s such a shame, really.

  3. This is definitely of Pixar’s weaker films. The plot is unfocused, rushed and is filled with a bunch of cliches that we’ve seen from other Disney films. The comedy is very forced and childish, and the tone in inconsistent. The relationship between Merida and Elinor is very well done, but it’s not enough to make up for the problems that this film has. I don’t think Brave is a bad film, but I don’t think it’s very good either. In my opinion, it shouldn’t have won the Oscar. Wreck-It Ralph or Paranorman should have won the award over Brave.

    1. Brave definitely should not have won, but it is clear the voters only chose it because it is the bigger Oscar bait, and they heard more about it. I wasnt fond of the comedy in the film, and the plot was for sure unfocused.

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